Blended Doors for Standout Style

If you want to create a smooth, uninterrupted aesthetic to your space, you might be missing one element that could really complete your look: the blended door. The blended door (not a technical term) is essentially a door that blends directly into the wall application. Visual interruption is prevented by this sense of unity in the aesthetic.

Check out these photos for inspiration. Blink and you might miss these sneaky blended doors.

Sophie Azouaou

Not merely is this bedroom soothing in soft blues and neutrals, but also the blended door prevents any distractions from this tranquil space. Notice the way the designer attained the look by continuing the architectural detailing the door and painting it the same shade as the walls.

LLC, Huestis Tucker Architects

Look very carefully at the corner to the right of the fireplace. Can you make out the door that is blended? Again, since the architectural detailing is continuing over the door, you hardly see the door in any way.

LASC Studio

Slanted walls may make a room feel constricted; the very best way to counterbalance that is using a clean aesthetic that won’t confuse the attention. Here, a fresh door is cut directly from the wooden wall. With no noticeable handle, you might walk clean past it.

A fast glance at this space and you may think, “Oh, what beautiful paneling surrounding the fireplace …”

Garrison Hullinger Interior Design Inc..

… only to be amazed that one of these panels is really a door. Creating the same panel layout on each side of the fireplace accounts the space, regardless of whether the left side opens as a door or not.

Birdseye Design

After the timber paneling used for your door is transported across the space, the eye reads it as a layout element versus a door.

Schwartz and Architecture

Another way to help the door blend in is by extending the material past the door itself. Here, the wood paneling is continuing between the two doors and past their borders.

Narofsky Architecture + ways2design

The track probably gives away this door, but nonetheless, a sliding door in precisely the same material as the wall provides a coordinated appeal.

Farinelli Construction, Inc..

You can disguise your pantry door using a chalkboard in addition to mimic cabinetry on the floor. Visitors will be amazed when they visit compose a note and the door falls open to an additional room.

Amy Jesaitis

Really want to trick your customers? Wallpaper directly over the door. Friends and family will be delighted by your smart design.

More:
Hidden Nooks and Secret Passageways

The First Impression: Cool Doors

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Kitchen Workbook: 8 Components of a Cottage Kitchen

Cottage isn’t just a decorating style. Cozy, joyful and unpretentious, it harks back to simpler times and evokes a feeling of simple, carefree living. And since the kitchen is usually one of the busiest spots in the house, it is logical to translate that mindset to your cabinetry, appliances, fixtures and more. If you are arranging a kitchen remodel or remodel, consider these ways to infuse your kitchen with cabin comfort.

More kitchen styles:
Vintage | Conventional | Transitional | Modern | Contemporary | Eclectic | Craftsman | Mediterranean

CapeRace Cultural Adventures

1. Soft colours. The cabin palette is usually light and airy, and kitchens follow suit. It’s difficult to go wrong with crisp, classic white, but soft yellowish, pale turquoise or mild khaki all seem appropriate and fresh also. Or try a mixture of cabinetry colours: one shade on the island with a contrasting hue on the cabinets.

Erotas Building Corporation

2. Open shelving. Installed in place of conventional upper chimney, spacious shelving recalls the days when kitchens were utilitarian than cosmetic. Not just was cabinetry pricey, but open shelves allowed cooks to retrieve tools and dishes quickly. Nowadays open shelves are as much about aesthetics as about design: Their openness helps make a space feel bigger, and they frequently house accessories along with kitchen implements.

You do not need to be obsessively neat and organized for open shelving to seem attractive, but you will want to make an attempt to not allow clutter build. Keeping dishware to one colour, as shown here, creates a dramatic effect.

Group 3

3. Beadboard. Nothing says cabin kitchen clearly than beadboard. This grooved style of paneling warms cabinetry and walls and provides architectural interest with a minimum of fuss. Because it has so much visual impact, you do not require much to make a cabin impact. Go the classic path and then paint it a creamy colour, choose the same hue as your cabinetry or sand it marginally for an obsolete, distressed look.

Garrison Hullinger Interior Design Inc..

4. Farmhouse sinks. Also called apron-front sinks, these beauties have made a comeback in recent decades. They feature a broad, shallow head and an extra-deep bowl which can accommodate large pots or heaps of dishes. Farmhouse sinks create a feeling of country living, yet they’re unfussy enough to work with cleaner-lined spaces. Even though some versions on the market have raised or cosmetic detailing, streamlined styles such as the one displayed here would be the most classic.

The Workshops of David T. Smith

5. Furniture-style cupboard details. Years back, before cupboards since we know them came into fashion, freestanding armoires, pie safes and presses were the guideline. Evoke that time frame with the addition of furniture features to built-ins. Tuck bun feet beneath lower cupboards and corbels beneath upper ones, or paint an integrated hutch a contrasting shade to provide the illusion it isn’t fixed.

Witt Construction

6. Cup pulls. Cup-style drawer pulls, like those that might have been found in an old-fashioned general shop, give an excess dash of time flavor to cabin kitchens. Pick a finish with patina, such as oil-rubbed bronze or brushed nickel.

7. Hardwood flooring. Before carpeting became de rigeur, hardwood floors were the standard, and they match cabin kitchen style. You can either leave the planks bare to demonstrate the natural splendor of the grain or paint them in a solid colour or a pattern like checkerboard. However, hardwoods aren’t the only choice for cabin kitchen flooring — linoleum, vintage-look tile or perhaps slate could work also.

Whitten Architects

8. Pendant lights. Low-hanging pendants help a kitchen feel comfy and also provide all-important task lighting. Select models which have a retro feel, with colors of weathered or weathered glass or brushed nickel. If you prefer, combine the pendants with vintage-inspired sconces and perhaps even a lamp or two to make a gathered feel.

In this show: How to Find Your Kitchen Design | How to Remodel Your Kitchen

More:
So Your Design is: Cottage
10 Reasons To Bring Back the Kitchen Table
How To Insert Cottage Charm to Your Kitchen

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Layout Calendar: March 2–22

Whether architecture, film or books are something, this roundup of upcoming events throughout the country has something to you. Continue reading for our 5 top picks.

unfinishedspaces.com

FILM FESTIVAL — March 1–11, 2012
Cinequest Film Festival
Unfinished Spaces, directed by Alysa Nahmias and Benjamin Murray
Showings: March 2, 1:45 p.m.; March 7, 6:30 p.m.; March 10, 4:15 p.m.
Camera 12, 201 S. Second St., San Jose, CA

As part of the Cinequest Film Festival, watch a documentary film telling the story of three visionary architects revealing a different kind of Cuban revolution. Back in 1961, Fidel Castro and Che Guevara commissioned three visionary architects, Roberto Gottardi, Ricardo Porro and Vittorio Garatti, to design an advanced artwork school campus on the grounds of a Havana golf program. Construction started for the National Art Schools, but as Castro’s political motives altered, the project was brought to a halt, and dancers, musicians, and musicians were forced to master in half-completed classrooms. The architectural miracle was neglected and almost forgotten in the aftermath of Castro’s revolution. Four years later, the exiled architects were invited by Castro to complete their unrealized architectural dreams, and Unfinished Spaces records their passionate journey.
Purchase tickets.

briankelly.com

TOUR — March 18, 2012, 11:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
Millard Sheets: A Legacy of Art and Architecture
Pomona, Claremont, CA

Combine the Los Angeles Conservancy and its Modern Committee since they take you on a one-time-only docent-led tour exploring the architecture and art of Millard Sheets. You will visit the next six sites: the prior Millard Sheets design and mosaic studioin Claremont (photograph); Garrison Theatre, Scripps College, where Sheets directed the artwork section for 19 years; Pomona First Federal, now the American Museum of Ceramic Art; Pomona First Federal, now U.S. Bank; Pomona Mall,the first pedestrian mall in America west of the Mississippi; andHome Savings Tower, currently Chase Bank.

From 5:00 to 6:15 p.m., participate in a panel discussion with artists Betty Davenport Ford and John Svenson, mosaicist Brian Worley, architect Rufus Turner and Millard’s daughter, Carolyn Sheets Owen-Towle. Read more information here.

Sheets was a nationally famous and extremely influential artist with the California School of painting who helped found the Otis Art Institute. Though he was never a licensed architect, Sheets’ work endures today, marking the Southern California architectural landscape. This tour is part of Pacific Standard Time, a collaboration of ethnic associations.

Price: $30 general public, $25 L.A. Conservancy members, $15 students, $10 kids 12 and younger. Purchase tickets here.

Amazon

DISCUSSION — March 8, 2012, 7 p.m.
Of the book Project Japan: Metabolism Talks
New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, Celeste Bartos Forum
Fifth Ave. at 42nd St., New York, NY

Hear from architect Rem Koolhaas, curator Hans Ulrich Obrist and New York Public Library Director of Public Programs Paul Holdengraber since they discuss Koolhaas and Obrist’s brand new book, Project Japan. Part oral history and part instruction, the book captures Japan’s radical postwar manner of nation building, researching the comradery among architects that are unthinkable among today’s competitive professionals.

Some of those topics Koolhaas, Obrist and Holdengraber will cover include the way the activist state mobilized its best abilities and meticulously planned the future of its cities, the way the press adopted the architect as a serious agent of social influence (think anti-“starchitect”), and also the way the areas of architecture, art, sociology and engineering collaborated to generate something fresh.

Price: $25 general admission, $15 Friends of the New York Public Library. Purchase tickets here.

Amazon

LECTURE — March 9, 2012, 1–2 p.m.
Depending on the book Landscaping for Privacy, by Marty Wingate
Chicago Botanic Garden
1000 Lake Cook Rd., Linnaeus Room, Glencoe, IL

Combine backyard and travel author Marty Wingate as she discusses her Most Recent book, Landscaping for Privacy, at the Chicago Botanic Garden. She’ll discuss how to design a calm retreat even in the urban environment. She’ll share practical tips on plant choices, hedges, purchasing displays and methods for creating the most visually satisfying use of distance. The lecture will be accompanied by a book signing.

Price: $10

CONFERENCE — March 19–22, 2012
2012 Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC) annual conference
Hyatt Regency Baltimore, 300 Light St., Baltimore, MD

With the theme “Celebrating Our Past, Shaping our Future,” this seminar celebrates the Interior Design Educators Council’s 50th year since the top organization for interior design educators. The seminar comprises programming and keynotes that reflect on past achievements and look to the future of the profession, and provides an engaging forum for interior design educators at each level. Keynotes will be by Jo Heinz, interior designer and managing principle of Staffelbach; and Rosalyn Cama, president and principal interior designer of CAMA.

More 2012 design events: Feb. 6–March 2, 2012, Feb. 17–March 9, 2012

What is in your calendar? Let us know in the Remarks.

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French Colonial Mansion in India

Only a hundred miles in the bustling town of Chennai in South India, the former French colony of Pondicherry rolls into view using expansive cashew plantations, little fishing villages and palm-fringed beaches. This French colonial beach home on the Bay of Bengal is famous for its hospitality in hosting international businesspeople and diplomats amidst acres of coconut groves and inside rooms full of Indian artifacts.

Dr. S. Devendra, known as “Doc,” has been opening the doors into the five-bedroom estate mansion as 1991, as a shore retreat for friends and partners of Shasun Pharmaceuticals, the family business and one of the world’s largest suppliers of aspirin.

in a Glance
Location: Pondicherry, India, near the Bay of Bengal
Size: 10,000 square feet; 5 bedrooms, 6 baths, multiple sunrooms, multimedia conference room
That is intriguing: A stone that is raised platform to the grounds functions as a stage for musical performances from local groups.

Wendy K. Leigh

The primary entry door has been reclaimed from a historical abandoned temple at the Tamilnadu region of South India. A classic wood carving accents the entrance from above, while hand-formed vintage pottery pieces flank the entryway.

Wendy K. Leigh

The French colonial structure spreads elegantly across manicured grounds in the end of a long, winding driveway curving toward the sea. Windows line the front, sides and back, affording expansive views of the estate landscaping and shore. Ivy-covered stucco and stone form exterior walls, with curved balconies extending from bedrooms, living spaces and sunrooms.

Wendy K. Leigh

Antique furniture in the Chettinadu and Pondicherry areas in Tamilnadu provide an authentic air to the inside spaces. Working with Anita Goubert, a regional antiques dealer and close friend in Pondicherry, Doc has selected each slice carefully to signify a variety of phases of history in South India. This wood-carved divan and encompassing seats are decorated with vibrant cushions crafted from formerly worn vintage saris.

Wendy K. Leigh

A second-floor covered sunroom is available from all five bedrooms in the home, using a wooden swing extended from rafters in the grand ceiling.

Wendy K. Leigh

Bedrooms have a minimalist style with white bed coverings, mosaic tile floors and black custom-designed solid wood window shutters. Individual baths are attached to every bedroom, with modern showers installed. Doc himself makes the journey from Chennai several times a week and intends to retire here, near the sea and the quaint, French-inspired village.

Wendy K. Leigh

Ceramic inlays are a surprise feature inside the railings of one of those dozens of beds in this home. Designed to accommodate the numerous guests who are welcome here, some of the larger bedrooms have around six beds.

Wendy K. Leigh

A guest bathroom on the bottom floor is available from the estate grounds and swimming pool. It’s three sinks, a separate changing room and an enclosed sauna.

Wendy K. Leigh

Pottery features greatly in the d├ęcor. This lamp was fashioned from early earthenware and sits atop one of those numerous reclaimed paintings which are tucked into each nook.

Wendy K. Leigh

A specially designed multimedia room permits the owner to host business conferences on a dedicated floor of the home. Outside of working hours, Doc frequently arranges for guests to relax by meditating at the world-famousMatrimandir,an enormous marble and gold ashram in the countryside less than five miles from the shore house.

Wendy K. Leigh

Sunrooms are sprinkled throughout the home, linking outdoors to indoors, many with views of the beach and water.

Wendy K. Leigh

Family, friends and business partners can relax in the intricately tiled outside aquatic place, which comprises two pools and a spa, with the bay shimmering in the background.

Wendy K. Leigh

Breezy walkways connect the entire home on both floors and overlook the Bay of Bengal. Benches afford views of the sunset and sunrise from several positions on each floor.

Wendy K. Leigh

Kudapah stone floors from Kerala adorns outdoor spaces, with natural cultivated bamboo overlooking a stone water container.

Wendy K. Leigh

The bounty of the farm grounds is on display on any given day, with mounds of coconuts heaped up outside the pantry and kitchen. Palm trees sway in the sea breezes, which are relished — temperatures in Pondicherry frequently reach over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Wendy K. Leigh

Coconuts are left to dry in sunlight prior to being turned into desserts by the numerous servants.

Wendy K. Leigh

Stone walkways on the estate grounds cause outbuildings sheltered by coconut palms.

Wendy K. Leigh

Statues and fountains of carved stone blend into the landscaping and fit the property’s exterior and interior style.

Wendy K. Leigh

A traditional outdoor bowl of drifting new flower petals offers “namaste,” an expression of welcome and warmth.

More:
Coastal Chic Family Getaway
Seaside Italian Escape
Modern Beach House using a Custom Twist

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Complex Family-Friendly Flat

When a San Francisco couple with a new baby purchased their flat in the Marina district, they understood they weren’t in it for the long haul. They planned to stay about three to five years while their loved ones grew and then to move on. “Because the customers knew this was not going to be their house forever, we decorated with pieces they would have the ability to take with them to their next home,” explains Ali Davin of Jute Interiors. Following is a glance at how she designed for the customers’ future with innovative design, family friendliness and versatility.

in a Glance
Who lives here: Two and two kids
Location: San Francisco
Size: 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms

Jute Interior Design

Blue, brown, gray-green and tan make a wonderful palette for the playroom, and the dark color of the sofa helps hide stains. “Everything in this apartment is quite childproof,” Davin states. She utilized sturdy exterior fabrics where possible.

The painted wall stripes incorporate Davin’s signature shade, Benjamin Moore’s Texas Leather. The picture over the sofa, of neighboring Ocean Beach, was a present from the client’s mother.

Zebra Shade: Jonathan Adler
Side Effects: Roost
Sofa: Crate and Barrel

Jute Interior Design

The kitchen, dining room and living room are all open to one another. “My customers inherited this kitchen,” she states. “While they wouldn’t always have picked these countertops and cabinets, it was not worth changing themso we brought in the tile backsplash, pendant lights and Bertoia stools to bring some design,” Davin states.

Berlin pendant lighting: Roost
Bertoia counter stools: Design Within Reach
Backsplash tile: Ann Sacks
Counters: Caesarstone

Jute Interior Design

“My client’s preferred color was gray, and she brought me that the problem of Domino featuring Jenna Lyons’ townhouse because her inspiration since she loved the way they used lots of gray with these pops of yellow,” states Davin. This soft color palette carries through all the open area and retains the dining room and living areas sophisticated, light and cheerful.

Drape cloth: Charcoal Ribbons by Hable Construction

Jute Interior Design

The dining room incorporates an interesting and flexible mixture of materials, textures and eras; it includes a custom-made dining settee, reupholstered seats in the 1950s, a metal and wood table and a pendant light. The outcome is a comfortable, beautiful and practical space.

Pendant light: Design Within Reach; dining table: Hickory Chair

Jute Interior Design

A comfortable sectional sofa holds a mixture of pillows that are muted. A leather ottoman can be utilized as a coffee table or extra seating. The painting, by artist Nancy Christensen of Charleston, South Carolina (a friend of the client), picks up the lavender color of the Scottish throw.

Sectional sofa: Room and Board; pillow cloth: Osborne and Little; zebra carpet: Williams-Sonoma Home

Jute Interior Design

This office was created with a possible future transformation in your mind. The gray walls and vibrant blue window remedies could be incorporated into a nursery, and the Parsons desk could take on many functions in just about any room.

Parsons desk: West Elm; Eames Eiffel Base Shell Chair: Design Within Reach; roman shade cloth: Quadrille Veneto Collection

Jute Interior Design

If their second child came along, it was easy to transform the workplace into a nursery school, swapping out the desk for a crib as well as the Maintain Calm and Carry On posters for flags with all the letters of the baby’s name. Pops of pink have been added to the gray, blue and white color scheme.

Jute Interior Design

The couple used this room as a nursery (as shown) if they moved in. Now their son is older, they’ve swapped the crib for a twin mattress, a very easy transformation from baby to larger boy bedroom.

Background: Porter’s Paints; crib: Nurseryworks

Jute Interior Design

Future transitions drove the design of the master bedroom as well. “My customer knew this furniture would be for the guest room in their second home, so we stuck with serene, gray and gender neutral,” Davin clarifies. “She also wanted a mattress which resembled Cameron Diaz’s character’s mattress in the film The Holiday.”

The background has an enjoyable Art Deco floral print that does not overwhelm the space. Swing-arm reading lamps make it feasible to put a tufted occasional seat where a nightstand would normally go. Like the remainder of the home’s furnishings, those in the master bedroom work nicely for this phase of the family’s life and will continue to do so in the next.

Velvet headboard cloth: Schumacher; background: Cole & Son

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Builder’s Beige Gets a Makeover
Family Home Gets New Soft-Modern Style
’70s Condo Gets Extreme Makeover

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