Kitchen Workbook: 8 Components of a Cottage Kitchen

Cottage isn’t just a decorating style. Cozy, joyful and unpretentious, it harks back to simpler times and evokes a feeling of simple, carefree living. And since the kitchen is usually one of the busiest spots in the house, it is logical to translate that mindset to your cabinetry, appliances, fixtures and more. If you are arranging a kitchen remodel or remodel, consider these ways to infuse your kitchen with cabin comfort.

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1. Soft colours. The cabin palette is usually light and airy, and kitchens follow suit. It’s difficult to go wrong with crisp, classic white, but soft yellowish, pale turquoise or mild khaki all seem appropriate and fresh also. Or try a mixture of cabinetry colours: one shade on the island with a contrasting hue on the cabinets.

Erotas Building Corporation

2. Open shelving. Installed in place of conventional upper chimney, spacious shelving recalls the days when kitchens were utilitarian than cosmetic. Not just was cabinetry pricey, but open shelves allowed cooks to retrieve tools and dishes quickly. Nowadays open shelves are as much about aesthetics as about design: Their openness helps make a space feel bigger, and they frequently house accessories along with kitchen implements.

You do not need to be obsessively neat and organized for open shelving to seem attractive, but you will want to make an attempt to not allow clutter build. Keeping dishware to one colour, as shown here, creates a dramatic effect.

Group 3

3. Beadboard. Nothing says cabin kitchen clearly than beadboard. This grooved style of paneling warms cabinetry and walls and provides architectural interest with a minimum of fuss. Because it has so much visual impact, you do not require much to make a cabin impact. Go the classic path and then paint it a creamy colour, choose the same hue as your cabinetry or sand it marginally for an obsolete, distressed look.

Garrison Hullinger Interior Design Inc..

4. Farmhouse sinks. Also called apron-front sinks, these beauties have made a comeback in recent decades. They feature a broad, shallow head and an extra-deep bowl which can accommodate large pots or heaps of dishes. Farmhouse sinks create a feeling of country living, yet they’re unfussy enough to work with cleaner-lined spaces. Even though some versions on the market have raised or cosmetic detailing, streamlined styles such as the one displayed here would be the most classic.

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5. Furniture-style cupboard details. Years back, before cupboards since we know them came into fashion, freestanding armoires, pie safes and presses were the guideline. Evoke that time frame with the addition of furniture features to built-ins. Tuck bun feet beneath lower cupboards and corbels beneath upper ones, or paint an integrated hutch a contrasting shade to provide the illusion it isn’t fixed.

Witt Construction

6. Cup pulls. Cup-style drawer pulls, like those that might have been found in an old-fashioned general shop, give an excess dash of time flavor to cabin kitchens. Pick a finish with patina, such as oil-rubbed bronze or brushed nickel.

7. Hardwood flooring. Before carpeting became de rigeur, hardwood floors were the standard, and they match cabin kitchen style. You can either leave the planks bare to demonstrate the natural splendor of the grain or paint them in a solid colour or a pattern like checkerboard. However, hardwoods aren’t the only choice for cabin kitchen flooring — linoleum, vintage-look tile or perhaps slate could work also.

Whitten Architects

8. Pendant lights. Low-hanging pendants help a kitchen feel comfy and also provide all-important task lighting. Select models which have a retro feel, with colors of weathered or weathered glass or brushed nickel. If you prefer, combine the pendants with vintage-inspired sconces and perhaps even a lamp or two to make a gathered feel.

In this show: How to Find Your Kitchen Design | How to Remodel Your Kitchen

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So Your Design is: Cottage
10 Reasons To Bring Back the Kitchen Table
How To Insert Cottage Charm to Your Kitchen

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Complex Family-Friendly Flat

When a San Francisco couple with a new baby purchased their flat in the Marina district, they understood they weren’t in it for the long haul. They planned to stay about three to five years while their loved ones grew and then to move on. “Because the customers knew this was not going to be their house forever, we decorated with pieces they would have the ability to take with them to their next home,” explains Ali Davin of Jute Interiors. Following is a glance at how she designed for the customers’ future with innovative design, family friendliness and versatility.

in a Glance
Who lives here: Two and two kids
Location: San Francisco
Size: 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms

Jute Interior Design

Blue, brown, gray-green and tan make a wonderful palette for the playroom, and the dark color of the sofa helps hide stains. “Everything in this apartment is quite childproof,” Davin states. She utilized sturdy exterior fabrics where possible.

The painted wall stripes incorporate Davin’s signature shade, Benjamin Moore’s Texas Leather. The picture over the sofa, of neighboring Ocean Beach, was a present from the client’s mother.

Zebra Shade: Jonathan Adler
Side Effects: Roost
Sofa: Crate and Barrel

Jute Interior Design

The kitchen, dining room and living room are all open to one another. “My customers inherited this kitchen,” she states. “While they wouldn’t always have picked these countertops and cabinets, it was not worth changing themso we brought in the tile backsplash, pendant lights and Bertoia stools to bring some design,” Davin states.

Berlin pendant lighting: Roost
Bertoia counter stools: Design Within Reach
Backsplash tile: Ann Sacks
Counters: Caesarstone

Jute Interior Design

“My client’s preferred color was gray, and she brought me that the problem of Domino featuring Jenna Lyons’ townhouse because her inspiration since she loved the way they used lots of gray with these pops of yellow,” states Davin. This soft color palette carries through all the open area and retains the dining room and living areas sophisticated, light and cheerful.

Drape cloth: Charcoal Ribbons by Hable Construction

Jute Interior Design

The dining room incorporates an interesting and flexible mixture of materials, textures and eras; it includes a custom-made dining settee, reupholstered seats in the 1950s, a metal and wood table and a pendant light. The outcome is a comfortable, beautiful and practical space.

Pendant light: Design Within Reach; dining table: Hickory Chair

Jute Interior Design

A comfortable sectional sofa holds a mixture of pillows that are muted. A leather ottoman can be utilized as a coffee table or extra seating. The painting, by artist Nancy Christensen of Charleston, South Carolina (a friend of the client), picks up the lavender color of the Scottish throw.

Sectional sofa: Room and Board; pillow cloth: Osborne and Little; zebra carpet: Williams-Sonoma Home

Jute Interior Design

This office was created with a possible future transformation in your mind. The gray walls and vibrant blue window remedies could be incorporated into a nursery, and the Parsons desk could take on many functions in just about any room.

Parsons desk: West Elm; Eames Eiffel Base Shell Chair: Design Within Reach; roman shade cloth: Quadrille Veneto Collection

Jute Interior Design

If their second child came along, it was easy to transform the workplace into a nursery school, swapping out the desk for a crib as well as the Maintain Calm and Carry On posters for flags with all the letters of the baby’s name. Pops of pink have been added to the gray, blue and white color scheme.

Jute Interior Design

The couple used this room as a nursery (as shown) if they moved in. Now their son is older, they’ve swapped the crib for a twin mattress, a very easy transformation from baby to larger boy bedroom.

Background: Porter’s Paints; crib: Nurseryworks

Jute Interior Design

Future transitions drove the design of the master bedroom as well. “My customer knew this furniture would be for the guest room in their second home, so we stuck with serene, gray and gender neutral,” Davin clarifies. “She also wanted a mattress which resembled Cameron Diaz’s character’s mattress in the film The Holiday.”

The background has an enjoyable Art Deco floral print that does not overwhelm the space. Swing-arm reading lamps make it feasible to put a tufted occasional seat where a nightstand would normally go. Like the remainder of the home’s furnishings, those in the master bedroom work nicely for this phase of the family’s life and will continue to do so in the next.

Velvet headboard cloth: Schumacher; background: Cole & Son

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